New book on multicultural marketing

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The owner of TransCity has recently published a new Dutch language book on multicultural marketing. The book describes the dilemmas marketers face when including consumers with ethnic minority backgrounds in the Netherlands and Europe.

Why does an IKEA spokesperson claim the introduction of a chicken hot dog has not been done to please both Muslims and Hindus in the Netherlands? Why didn’t the Share a Coke campaign by Coca-Cola include the name Mohamed, one of the most popular male names in many European countries?

In over 350 pages, this Dutch language book explains why consumers with ethnic minority backgrounds want to recognize themselves in mainstream European marketing and communications platforms.

If you understand Dutch, you can order the book here.

A scholar who happens to be a Muslim

Why would a scholar of religions with four degrees, including one in the New Testamant and fluency in Biblical Greek, who’s been studying the origins of Christianity for two decades, write a book about the life of Jesus? Check out these embarrasing ten minutes for Fox News presenter Lauren Green. The Fox News presenter’s major achievement? After a 10 minute interview we still know nothing about the book.

Pepsi & Lay’s: Ramadan TVC 2013

Above a mutual TV ad of Pepsi and Lay’s on Ramadan 2013, with over 3.5 million YouTube views. It includes an activation campaign, encouraging consumers to upload their personal Ramadan moments and share them with the rest of the world: pepsiramadan.com

Demographic shift in Britain

(Source: The Guardian)

Government statisticians sliced a cross-section through England and Wales on Tuesday and exposed a place that is healthy, increasingly multi-faith and more likely than ever to be talking in Polish, Hindi or Urdu around the dinner table.

The results of the 2011 census of 56 million people, the most thorough analysis yet of how life changed in the first decade of the 21st century, revealed that our towns and cities are global villages with an extra 2.9 million foreign-born people living in England and Wales since 2001 – most from India, Poland and Pakistan – and an additional 1.1 million Muslims, bringing the total to 2.7 million.

Christianity, or at least the number identifying themselves as followers of the largest religion, is on the slide with more than 4 million fewer saying they followed the church than in 2001.

Red more:

Click here to read the full article on the The Guardian.

Click here to read the key pints on the The Guardian website.

The Power of the Hispanic Dollar

(From: Multicultural Marketing Blog)

Hispanics have quietly become the new “Super Spender”. There has been an increase in the cultural influence of the Hispanic community. Shopping centers and grocery stores are being built, targeting Hispanics. For many Hispanics, their culture and heritage is a major influence. They don’t shy away from tradition, instead they embrace it. They are looking, searching, seeking for the same ingredients Abuela used to prepare meals or for the beautiful lace dresses for their daughters.

Marketers need to pay attention and do what it takes to earn the Hispanic dollar. According to the U.S. census surveys, the Hispanic community spent $490 billion in 2000. It has now surged to $1.1 trillion and expected to grow up to 48 percent by 2015.

Click here to read the full article on the Multicultural Marketing Blog.

“Whitewashing” in Hollywood?

(Source: CNN)

Sacha Baron Cohen’s new role as a fictional Middle Eastern tyrant in his movie “The Dictator” is causing plenty of controversy.

Commentators like Dean Obeidallah have criticized the actor, who is not of Middle Eastern descent, for portraying an Arab man, especially since the character is intended to reflect stereotypes.

Actor and comedian Aasif Mandvi of “The Daily Show” talked to CNN’s Susanne Malveaux about what he sees as Hollywood’s “whitewashing,” or casting white actors in ethnic roles. In the video above, Mandvi gives his take on why he thinks “whitewashing” persists, even in an ever-growing multicultural society.

Barack Obama on same-sex marriage

Statement by US President Barack Obama on same-sex marriage:

“Today, I was asked a direct question and gave a direct answer: I believe that same-sex couples should be allowed to marry. I hope you’ll take a moment to watch the conversation, consider it, and weigh in yourself on behalf of marriage equality.

I’ve always believed that gay and lesbian Americans should be treated fairly and equally. I was reluctant to use the term marriage because of the very powerful traditions it evokes. And I thought civil union laws that conferred legal rights upon gay and lesbian couples were a solution.

But over the course of several years I’ve talked to friends and family about this. I’ve thought about members of my staff in long-term, committed, same-sex relationships who are raising kids together. Through our efforts to end the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, I’ve gotten to know some of the gay and lesbian troops who are serving our country with honor and distinction.

What I’ve come to realize is that for loving, same-sex couples, the denial of marriage equality means that, in their eyes and the eyes of their children, they are still considered less than full citizens.

Even at my own dinner table, when I look at Sasha and Malia, who have friends whose parents are same-sex couples, I know it wouldn’t dawn on them that their friends’ parents should be treated differently.

So I decided it was time to affirm my personal belief that same-sex couples should be allowed to marry.

I respect the beliefs of others, and the right of religious institutions to act in accordance with their own doctrines. But I believe that in the eyes of the law, all Americans should be treated equally. And where states enact same-sex marriage, no federal act should invalidate them.”

Good luck - Best Buy’s Euro 2012 ad

A team of millions

Letter in Hindi

Small letter, school uk

(Source: Daily Mail, May 4th, 2012)

A woman has branded her daughter’s school as racist after she was sent a letter in Hindi - despite the fact she speaks English. Mother-of-three Raheela Ahmed insists the only reason she was sent the letter was because of her Asian name.

She said: ‘I have been really offended. It is just insulting to send me a letter in another language. ‘I think it was in Hindi and they have just assumed because of my surname that I speak one of those languages. ‘You are trying to be racist towards me - this is how I felt when I got the letter.’

A qualified classroom assistant, Mrs Ahmed of Seaton Burn, North Tyneside, has lived in England for 15 years. The letter outlined times she could drop her daughter Aysha, eight, off at school as she had been dropped off too early.

She said: ‘The only thing I could understand was the date, a time of 8.45am and my daughter’s name.

Click here to read the full article in the Daily Mail.